No Blue Crane chicks this year for John and Donsie

We hoped that 2018 would be the year that our resident Blue Cranes John and Donsie, would finally have chicks. In October we updated our followers that they had laid two eggs, and were anxious to see if they would hatch. We had to wait 30 long days.  Unfortunately 30 days passed, and there was no movement in the eggs. We decided to wait another two weeks, as Donsie was not…
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HESC THANK YOU – OCTOBER & NOVEMBER 2018

Special thanks to everyone that has contributed towards the animals at the Hoedspruit Endangered Species Centre over the past few weeks. 974 TELKOM CYCLE CHALLENGE – RIDE FOR RHINOS The HESC was proud to be selected as a supported cause, in the Telkom 947 Cycle Challenge once again this year. We had the excellent support of over 90 cyclists that cycled for the Rescued Rhinos @ HESC, and we are…
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World Cheetah Day 2018 – Looking back at our Journey with Cheetahs.

Today is WORLD CHEETAH DAY 2018, a highly significant day for us at HESC. The reason for our existence today, was sparked by Lente Roode’s passion for cheetahs from a young child. At the age of six, Lente was given an orphaned cheetah cub to care for after a neighbouring farmer shot its mother. They called her ‘Sebeka’ and she soon became part of the Schürmann household (Lente’s maiden name). Lente…
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Rehabilitated rhino poaching survivors, Lion’s Den and Dingle Dell, are released back into the wild.

Five years after two rhinos survived a vicious poaching attack that left them severely injured and a bull dead, they have been returned to the wild. Fully rehabilitated, but dehorned to deter further poaching attacks, they are living testimony of the rehabilitation work the Hoedspruit Endangered Species Centre (HESC) performs on injured and orphaned animals brought to the Centre. On Monday 3 December, Lion’s Den and Dingle Dell, two white…
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Why does Mopane eat elephant dung?

Many a curious eyebrow is raised, when people learn that Mopane, an orphaned elephant calf at HESC, often enjoys eating a decent portion of fresh adult elephant dung. It may sound strange, but it is a natural phenomena called “coprophagia” that is seen in many animals, not only elephants, whereby they eat the feces of their elders.  It is most common in baby elephants that are transitioning from drinking only milk…
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