Tag Archives: Cheetah Conservation

HESC performs DNA profiling on four cheetah cubs

Share this article… Many of our followers are aware of the cheetah DNA profiling we have been conducting. A change in regulations and the implementation of a new set of requirements for DNA profiling has necessitated this, and HESC has fully complied in order to get the necessary accreditation from various institutions. This is an extremely intense, tedious and stressful process – from the darting and subsequent monitoring of the…
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Dr Rogers treats an ill male cheetah

Share this article… The 1st of August 2017 was a busy day at HESC. Dr Rogers was on-site to treat a male cheetah that wasn’t doing well, and then also did DNA profiling on four cheetah cubs. We’ve noticed recently that one of our male cheetahs was not eating well and his condition was deteriorating as a result. Dr Rogers darted the cheetah, and a catheter was facilitated in order…
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Two cheetah cubs treated for eye infection

Share this article… Two of our young cheetah cubs recently developed an eye infection. This was caused by grass seeds which entered both their right eyes. We’ve had substantial rains in the past weeks which has resulted in the grass growing significantly long in a short space of time. Unfortunately, this can have its own disadvantages. According to Dr. Peter Rogers from Provet, the seeds are so small and, therefore,…
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GETTING TO KNOW THE POWER COUPLE BEHIND U.S. FRIENDS OF HESC

Share this article…Allen and Heidi Roberts with Simon Mnisi A holiday can sometimes have unexpected consequences and in the case of the Hoedspruit Endangered Species Centre (HESC), one such holiday had an enormous and far-reaching impact for which we are immensely grateful! It all started some 12 years ago when we had the pleasure of meeting a dynamic New York couple, Allen and Heidi Roberts.  Whilst staying at Camp Jabulani…
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The survival and genetic diversity of the cheetah

Share this article… The Cheetah is classified as vulnerable in the IUCN red list . This is due to different factors, but most importantly the poor genetic diversity in the species. Many researchers believe this came about 10 000 years ago when extreme climatic changes drove many animal species to extinction. The cheetah species that survived this period (now known as Acinonyx jubatus) found itself in a genetic bottleneck with…
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