Category Archives: Rescue and Rehabilitation

HESC rehabilitates and releases a Southern Ground Hornbill

The team at HESC are delighted to announce a brief and successful rehabilitation and release of a Southern Ground Hornbill back into the wild. Emaciated and very weak when he came to us last month after being found on a wildlife reserve not far from Jabulani, it took barely two and a half weeks to restore his health. With its large form, huge black beak and striking colour on the throat…
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The Kindness of Individuals in the Rhino Crisis

Last month, we at HESC spent a day with Investec and British actor, Nicholas Pinnock, and American actress, Shannon Elizabeth dehorning rhinos, in a campaign to expose international audiences to the realities of the rhino crisis. Investec set up the Investec Rhino Lifeline  as a way to do their part for rhinos: by educating young people, aiding rhino rescues and focusing on ways to reduce the demand for rhino horns….
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DO YOU KNOW YOUR RHINO?

Do you know everything there is to know about rhinos? Perhaps… perhaps not. These facts below are great not only to drop into the middle of a conversation on your next safari or dinner party; they’re also one way to better understand these unique animals. As with much of nature and life, there is so much more than meets the eye when it comes to the rhinoceros. These fascinating creatures…
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Update on Miss Piggy, our Bushpig patient

Towards the end of July 2018, a little bushpig, not much older than three months old, was brought into our care at the HESC Animal Hospital. She was badly hurt, resulting in two open wounds, one in her rear as well as on her knee, and sadly, she had also broken the tibia bone in her back right leg. After receiving treatment by the magic hands of our dedicated Wildlife…
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Moose and Mickey, Two White-Tailed Mongooses in our care at HESC.

We have two new friends at HESC, Moose and Mickey, two White-Tailed Mongooses that were brought into our care within a month of each other. Moose, (a female),  was the first to arrive at HESC. She was handraised from a tiny pup, by someone who had found her on her own in their plantation. Her back legs were weak, and she struggled to walk when we first got her. We adjusted…
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