Category Archives: Lions Den & Dingle Dell

Lion’s Den’s Treatment

Drs Peter Roger & Johan Marais treated Lion’s Den again on 26 February 2015. Although Lion’s Den covers the wound/hole with mud, we were worried that maggots might infest the wound again and that Lion’s Den would be worse off than a month ago. We received the question before of whether maggots are doing good work by cleaning the wound. Maggots are used in certain wound cleaning processes in a controlled environment…
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Great news for Lion’s Den!

We have had the most emotional few weeks, especially with the arrival of our new baby rhino Matimba into our care. However, this hasn’t been the only thing that has brought tears to our eyes. We have some very special news to announce that we have been dying to share with everyone! In August of last year, Lion’s Den and Dingle Dell were poached and their horns were brutally cut…
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The replacement of Lion’s Den’s cast

Once again, on Friday, 31 January, Dr Rogers and his crew arrived at 3pm to replace Lion’s Den’s damaged cast covering the once-exposed sinus cavity. The darting took less effort than expected but the ever-protective Dingle Dell was patrolling and threatening the vehicles and the team which made things tricky. Once darted, Lion’s Den went down in a densely grown part of the rhino camp. Her head came to rest…
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An Update on Dingle Dell

When it was discovered that our younger rhino’s cast had been damaged, a team was once again assembled at the Hoedspruit Endangered Species Centre to replace Dingle Dell’s cast and to check up on her progress. After quite a struggle to dart the smaller cow, Dingle Dell was finally anaesthetised and the team immediately began working on removing the cast. A local anaesthetic was injected around the wound to block…
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UPDATE ON THE POACHED RHINOS FROM HESC’S VET, NINA KISCH

Unfortunately, it seems as if our team will continually be battling the need to keep the rhinos’ wounds covered, particularly as we head into summer which brings an abundance of flies. As the wounds start to heal, the healing process is itchy and the rhinos’ natural instinct is to rub their noses against trees etc. Due to their incredible power and weight, they are almost effortlessly able to remove even the most secure…
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