Tag Archives: wild dogs

Back to the wild – Our wild dogs release

At the beginning of the year an injured wild dog was transported to HESC and was treated by Dr Rogers. He had been severely bitten in the dorsal area (haunch/hind legs) and needed veterinary care. Dr Rogers darted the animal and stitched him up before placing him in quarantine – this is where we keep all animals in need of high care treatment. The full story on the arrival can…
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Injured wild dog brought to HESC

The Veterinary clinic at HESC, with its animal hospital (containing recuperation and quarantine facilities), is widely recognized as one of the best facilities to treat sick and injured wild animals. This facility was once again put to good use when, on the 12th of January, an injured wild dog was brought in to HESC. He had been severely bitten in the dorsal area (haunch/hind legs) and needed veterinary care. Dr…
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An update of the latest happenings at HESC

Over the last month and half, the HESC curators have been busy at work taking care of Amanzi (the orphaned baby elephant who sadly did not make it) and the orphaned rhinos. But of course we could never forget about all the other animal residents at the centre, and we thought we would bring you an update on all the behind-the-scenes action that has been taking place over the month…
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Why do we keep wild dogs at HESC?

The African wild dog is the most endangered large carnivore in Africa, and so we take their preservation personally. We are currently home to a rather unusual pack of six male and one female wild dogs, with another two individual males which are not part of the pack. This very unusual male to female ratio will hopefully be equalised with the arrival of some new pack members arriving at The…
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HESC’s WILD DOGS

There has always been a very successful wild dog breeding programme at the Hoedspruit Endangered Species Centre (HESC). However, about five years ago, the alpha male of the pack was given a vasectomy, which is a minor operation that prevented him from fathering any pups, but left the testosterone in his system to enable him to keep his position in the pack. Even though there were no more wild dog…
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