Wild Dog Adoption

HESC-Wild-dogs

Taco and Timo – adopted by Mrs Mea van Dyk and Mrs Petra van Vugt from the Netherlands

HESC’s main focus has always been on endangered species, but until now only the cheetah has been part of the adoption programme. That’s all going to change however, as we’re embarking on an exciting new venture that will see the Wild dogs, Ground hornbills, Black-footed cats and Sable antelope being included in the programme as well.

The Wild dogs were the first to benefit from this inspired initiative.

Why on earth would you want to adopt a Wild dog? We realise that on the surface it may seem a little strange. After all, these animals are genuinely wild, and living in captivity doesn’t change that. Unlike the cheetah, who will pose for photographs or rub its sleek body against your leg while purring loudly, the Wild dog is not so obliging.

But that’s the amazing thing about adopting one of them! Wild and untamable, the fact that you can’t pet these dogs makes them that much more intriguing. Falling in love with them is still easy though. With their Mickey Mouse ears, fluffy white tails and playful, curious natures, how could you not? After all, they’re certainly a species worth conserving.

The Wild dog Adoption Programme has two options:
Pack dog adoption
You can choose any dog in the pack and name it!
Accompanied by one of our trained guides, you will be escorted to the Wild dog camp where you can then choose your dog. We will then photograph it (their magnificent patterned coats make it easy to identify them) for future reference.
Cost: R1 500 per dog per year.
Alpha dog adoption
If you are someone who only accepts the very best that life has to offer, then this is the option for you. You can choose between our two alpha dogs (male or female) and give them a name befitting their titles.
Cost: R2 500 per dog per year.
Whichever option you choose, you will receive the following:

  • a board with your name on it at the entrance to the Wild dogs’ camp, as well as at the entrance to the Centre itself
  • an Adoption Certificate
  • a special gift
  • updates throughout the year
  • a subscription to our newsletter.

The adoption fee goes towards the following:

  • Food and supplements for the pack
  • Inoculations and vaccinations
  • Medical attention
  • Wild dog camp maintenance

If you still need some convincing, here are a few more reasons why you should adopt a wild dog:

  • They are critically endangered
  • They are the most successful predator in Africa
  • They are highly social with strong bonds between pack members
  • They have unique, beautifully coloured coats
  • They can’t be tamed, and remain one of the few species left in the world that are still to some degree “untouched” by humans
  • They have quirky, down to earth personalities
  • And of course, who can resist those Mickey Mouse ears?

Taco and Timo are pleased to announce that they are the first of our pack dogs to be adopted! Mrs Mea van Dyk and Mrs Petra van Vugt – two wonderful ladies from the Netherlands – decided to contribute to the work we are doing by adopting these playful youngsters.

From the bottom of our hearts we thank them for their generosity!
To think that these dogs might one day be found only in a photograph is unfathomable. We can’t imagine what the bush might be like without these painted beauties, but if you adopt one then we might not have to. Click here to see more photos of our Wild dogs.

This Post Has 2 Comments

  1. Marcus Senyatsi

    Hi Please help. My wife and I do live stock farming in Mookgophong(Naboomspruit) area, Limpopo. There is a wild dog problem in our area. There are 16 wild dogs causing huge damage to farms. My neighbour lost a cow last night to them. Please can you assist with removal thereof because farmers are threatening to shoot all of them dead. I can be reached on 0769818707. If there is someone cloe to us dealing with the endangered species, please refer them to us.

    1. HESC

      Hi there, we believe that you were contacted about this, and given guidance to contact your local authorities. Hope it was resolved!

Leave a Reply